Household style tips: Clean up traces merge with a basic New England shade palette in this property bar

A residence bar in Lexington.Photograph by Keller and Keller/Joseph Keller

Christine Tuttle and her purchasers ended up discussing ending the basement in their Lexington residence when the pandemic hit. “They stated finding a foosball table, and suddenly the partner reported, ‘Let’s set a soaked bar in the corner,’” Tuttle remembers. To accommodate the couple’s want for 4 stools on the entrance and two on the stop devoid of impeding the movement from the stairs to the seating space further than the bar, the designer advised an on-development curved silhouette. The couple hangs out at the bar immediately after meal with a diverse, fun cocktail each 7 days. “It’s like a night out on the city,” she says.

1. The clients’ possess white-bronze Ironware Worldwide stools—with stain-resistant upholstered seats—worked well with Tuttle’s design.

2. Tuttle wrapped the bar in wood tambour paneling painted Farrow & Ball Hague Blue. “Tambour has Nordic and Japanese influences,” she says, “but the basic navy shade can make the style and design really feel extremely New England.”

3. Area artist Seth B. Minkin gave the few the triptych as a marriage ceremony present. “When we unpacked the box from the shift and held them up, it was a ideal match,” Tuttle claims.

4. The burnished silver leaf steel pendants by Aerin for Visual Comfort and ease provide light downlight, tie to the stools, and do not stand out. “I did not want the lights to get focus away from the backsplash,” Tuttle states.

5. The Phillip Jeffries variegated-wooden mosaic wallcovering is made from die-slash pieces of wood veneer that are arranged in a geometric cubist sample and stained blue.

6. Flexible tambour sheets wrap snuggly all over the posts at the stop of the bar that would have been much too expensive to relocate. “Boxing them in with standard trim would have been cumbersome and did not healthy stylistically with the curved style and design,” Tuttle suggests. “It’s what prompted me to first assume of working with tambour.”


Marni Elyse Katz is a standard contributor to the Globe Journal. Mail responses to [email protected]